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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Political Risk And the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America found in the catalog.

Political Risk And the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America

Jorg Stosberg

Political Risk And the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America

An Empirical Analysis With a Case Study on Mexico (Gottingen Studies in Development Economics)

by Jorg Stosberg

  • 304 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Peter Lang Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social & political philosophy,
  • Business & Economics,
  • History - General History,
  • Business/Economics,
  • Latin America,
  • Latin America - General,
  • Economics - General

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages344
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12830464M
    ISBN 103631533462
    ISBN 109783631533468

      Foreign direct investment (FDI) in Latin America fell in , down 16 percent to $ billion according to the latest ECLAC report. This outpaced global declines closer to 7 percent, and fell far behind other emerging markets, which saw investments rise . Downloadable (with restrictions)! This meta-analysis attempts to synthesize and review decades of research on the relationship between institutional factors and host country foreign direct investment (FDI) attractiveness. Using prior tests derived from 97 primary studies, we find support for prior theoretical predictions that institutional factors such as political stability, democracy, and Cited by:

      An important concern is whether government sanctions influence private foreign direct investment (FDI) decisions, the largest source of foreign capital. In the first study to assess empirically the relationship between economic sanctions and FDI, we consider whether U.S. sanctions influence U.S. FDI inflows into targeted countries.   Country risk refers to the economic, political and business risks that are unique to a specific country, and that might result in unexpected investment losses. This article will examine the.

    Political risk is the risk an investment's returns could suffer as a result of political changes or instability in a country. Instability affecting investment returns could stem from a change in.   Stylized evidence indicates that democracies and autocracies both expropriate foreign direct investment but that democracies do so less frequently. What explains the Cited by:


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Political Risk And the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America by Jorg Stosberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book empirically analyzes the impact of political risks on foreign direct investment flows to Latin American countries. A case study of Mexico and its policy towards foreign investors offers further empirical evidence for the importance of the political environment for investment decisions of.

Political risks like expropriations, riots, revolutions or civil wars are important obstacles for investment. This book empirically analyzes the impact of political risks on foreign direct investment flows to Latin American : Jörg Stosberg.

Political Risk and the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America Jörg Stosberg - Downloaded from PubFactory at 08/03/ PM. DOI: /b Corpus ID: Political Risk and the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America @inproceedings{StosbergPoliticalRA, title={Political Risk and the Institutional Environment for Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America}, author={J{\"o}rg Stosberg}, year={} }.

Political risk and the institutional environment for foreign direct investment in Latin America: an empirical analysis with a case study on Mexico Author: Jörg Stosberg. political risk, based on a number of sub-components, and several control variables on the value of foreign direct investment inflows.

For their data sample of 31 developing countries, the political risk index is statistically significant and the coefficient implies that countries with. "Political risk, institutions and foreign direct investment," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol.

23(2), pagesJune. Busse, Matthias & Hefeker, Carsten, " Political Risk, Institutions and Foreign Direct Investment," Discussion Paper SeriesHamburg Institute of International Economics. 1Political risk is defined as the possibility that political events in a country will affect the business climate and investors will not make as much money as expected (Howell, ).

3 (), in an attempt to measure political risk, deducted financial risks from total country risks to calculate political risks. This study investigates the impact of institutional quality on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows using panel data for low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high-income countries for the sample period of – using the system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM).

The empirical results confirm that institutional quality has a positive impact on FDI in all group of by: 8. economic integration, the inflows of foreign direct investment into Africa have been significantly lower than those of other developing economies in Asia and Latin America (Makoni, ).

Foreign Portfolio Investment (FPI), on the other hand, is that investment made by aAuthor: Patricia Lindelwa Rudo Makoni. Foreign direct investment is a desirable form of capital inflow to emerging and developing countries because such investment is less susceptible to crises and sudden stops.

The goal of this paper has been to explore in detail the role of political risk and institutions in host countries as determinants of foreign direct by: This paper focuses on the most recent trends of Chinese finance (foreign direct investment (FDI) and development loans) in Latin America and their impact on economic development.

In particular, this paper explores the economic and institutional factors that attract loans and FDI from China to Latin America. tic policies to maximise the benefits of foreign presence in the domestic economy. The study Foreign Direct Investment for Development attempts primarily to shed light on the second issue, by focusing on the overall effect of FDI on macro-economic growth and other welfare-enhancing processes, and on the channels through which these benefits take effect.

The authors of this paper expand on earlier studies of the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) by empirically analyzing various factors - including political risk, business conditions. by foreign firms to invest in a group of countries is influenced by economic factors, as opposed to political risk and institutional performance.

We consider the importance of these factors as drivers of foreign direct investment (FDI) for 32 European countries (subsequently divided into three pooled clusters) by means ofCited by:   I am a Latin America focused political analyst and writer.

I split my time between New York City and Mexico City. My book, Searching For Modern Mexico, was published in Author: Nathaniel Parish Flannery. Foreign direct investment in Latin America has a long history, often dating back to the 19th century. Early FDI was primarily export-oriented and/or driven by MNEs seeking natural resource supplies.

Import substitution industrialization in the post-WWII era led to a shift in FDI toward manufacturing for domestic by: Over the past ten years, governments in Latin America from across the political spectrum have lowered barriers to foreign investment.

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) FDI Restrictiveness Index, several countries rank at or near the level of the United States, including Argentina, Chile, Colombia, and Brazil (Figure 2).

of foreign investors, investment decisions in emerging markets are influenced by economic and political risks. Many believe that successful implementation of structural reforms by the host government is a positive signal to foreign investors as it implies less investment risk.

Thus, the progress of. Throughout the s, the amount of foreign direct investment directed at both developed and developing nations increased dramatically.

This trend reflects: A. a slowdown in global economic activity. the increasing share of the U.S. in the total FDI stock. the decline in cross-border flows of foreign direct investment. It describes the pattern of FDI originating in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean, focusing on the international expansion under way at some of the region’s major companies, the so-called trans-Latins.

The main theme of this report is the operations of European companies in Latin Format: Paperback.Latin America 31 ChApteR 5 FDI foreign direct investment GDP gross domestic product GTZ German Agency for Technical Cooperation (now GIZ – German industries.

enabling environments for agribusiness and agro-industries development. 3. agribusiness. enabling environments for agribusiness and agro-industries Size: KB.Several different ones. One of those is the following; "A wide range of events, actions, processes and characteristics of socio-political nature that have the potential to - directly or indirectly - significantly and negatively affect the goals of foreign direct investors".